Naming Quilts

Do you name your quilts?

Yesterday I offered my daughter one of two quilts. She moved into a new home recently. Though the quilts are very different, I thought either of them would be a great addition to her family room.


Stacked Coins design. 65.5″ x 72.5″. August 2016. Photo by Jim Ruebush.


Still Climbing Mountains. 57″ x 64″. August 2016. Photo by Jim Ruebush.

She wondered why the Delectable Mountain quilt (lower) has a name and the Stacked Coins quilt (upper) does not. I didn’t have a good reason for her. Mostly it’s because I didn’t think of a name for it yet.

Do you name your quilts? How do you decide? When you do name, is it based on the pattern or design, or the colors used, or the person who will own it? My quilt names come from all of those. Untied is named for both the center fabric, as well as the uninhibited way I created it.


Untied. 41″ x 47″. Hand-quilted. July 2016. Photo by Jim Ruebush.

Moonlight Waltz reminds me of the colors of shadows in moonlight, while the pattern of pale squares within the middle blue border reminds of dancers waltzing around a ballroom.


Moonlight Waltz. 90″ x 90″. July 2016. Photo by Jim Ruebush.

Last night before I fell asleep, I did think of a name for the Stacked Coins. When I make the label, I will call it “If I Had A Nickel…”

And by the way, she chose Still Climbing Mountains. Because we are.


“I finally figured out my magic formula, this funny 3-legged stool … I have to identify my priorities correctly so I can balance my resources right. And I have to get my balance right to maximize my power.” 

So I wrote in an email to a friend two years ago, and so I shared with you in my last post on balance.

Identify my priorities. It’s something I’ve been thinking about a lot. Sometimes it is easy to know where to spend my resources. Other times it’s not as clear. Things are muddled right now. I have few ambitions. I have no bucket-list quilts to make. I don’t need to clear my stash. I’m not writing a book or teaching a class. There are no milestone quilts to make for loved ones. I don’t need excuses to buy fabric if I want.

And while I’ve largely recovered from messing up my left knee, my right one has taken a major hit. Physical therapy starts Friday. Doc says I shouldn’t expect to be back in a normal groove until the end of the year. Today? Going downstairs to my studio was possible, but not easy.

I do have some goals, some plans. I have an appliqué project I should spend more time with. I’ve volunteered for my guild’s program committee to schedule speakers, and also to help with next year’s quilt show. I’m almost done organizing my digital images of quilts, from all sources — two laptops, three flash drives, and at least a couple of “cloud” spaces. All of these things can be accomplished with minimal physical capabilities.

Besides these, I have two VA hospital quilts in progress. One is the project you’ve seen. The top is done and the back is ready. I have another in process. It’s a 6 x 8 layout of hourglass blocks. The darks are all blues. I haven’t cut the lights yet, and I won’t for at least several days.

And I volunteered to quilt several donation projects for my guild. We have around 80 tops ready to be quilted. People like to make tops, but finishing is harder. Obviously, right now I can’t do any. Once I get some strength and stability back in BOTH legs, I should be able to do a few.

From a more philosophical view, I do have priorities. I want to continue to make quilts that are rewarding to me. Rewards come from varying sources. Sometimes it is from design, sometimes from color, sometimes from the challenge involved, sometimes from ease. But I don’t have a notion of what my next quilt will be, after the VA quilts.

Right now I don’t feel very powerful. I feel kinda weak, wimpy, slow. So my highest priority right now is to get my physical strength and flexibility back. As I said the other day, sturdy and flexible — that’s the goal. I’ll work on that. The rest will follow.


Three Comments on Balance

In the last post I showed you the quilt I’m working on now. It’s intended as a donation for our local VA hospital, to warm a vet with the love stitched into it. You can see the blocks below.


I talked about choosing the layout, and how using an even number of blocks across, when there are alternate blocks, can lead to an unbalanced layout. My EQ7 isn’t working properly right now, or I would show you a picture I create. Instead I’ll show you from Roberta Horton’s book Scrap Quilts: The Art of Making Do.


From Roberta Horton’s book Scrap Quilts: The Art of Making Do, page 19.

Notice that there are three star blocks on the left and two on the right, making it asymmetrical. If there were another row across, giving three and three, the arrangement still wouldn’t have left-right symmetry. The lack of symmetry makes it feel unbalanced.

In my quilt above, I have a similar layout, but use half-square triangle blocks rather than plain alternate blocks. To my eye, it is balanced. What’s the difference? The strong diagonal line created by the HST takes the emphasis off the horizontal (or vertical) row arrangement. The visual weight isn’t in the shoofly blocks; it’s in the HST, which creates diagonal lines that are symmetrical. (For more about visual weight, see my posts on proportion, parts 1, 2, and 3.)

For the last couple of years, I’ve had the goal to be sturdy and flexible. It’s an easy motto to say: “Sturdy and flexible — that’s the goal!” I apply it to both my physical and mental health. To be sturdy, I need good balance. But in August I hurt my left knee, and it’s astonishing how quickly everything else fell apart! My right leg wants to work much harder than my left leg does. My upper body feels a lot more competent than my lower body does. I am all out of balance, and I don’t feel at all sturdy, and my legs especially are not flexible. (Mentally things seem to be going fine, thank you.)

If you’re a quilter you know how physical our making can be. I get up and down off the floor once a piece is too big for my design wall. I walk up and down stairs, 15 steps each time, to get to my studio. I stand for long stretches when quilting at the longarm. And even sitting at the domestic machine requires good core strength to keep from hurting my back. I need this all to be easier again!

I decided it was time to ask for professional help. I’ve started working with a personal trainer at a local gym. So far we’ve assessed the problem (and she agrees with my evaluation, but in much more specific terms.) And she’s begun showing me the type of work I’ll do to get back on track. I’m looking forward to improving my strength, flexibility, and endurance, and to getting my balance back.

I’m also pondering how to set myself up to finish the year well. The key to doing what I want is knowing what I want. That sounds simple, but you know as well as I that sorting priorities isn’t always easy.

Here is something I wrote to a friend in email two years ago:

… your power is in what you DO, not in what you DID. For me, I can only DO effectively when I am doing the right things, really spending my time and energy on my true priorities. There are a lot of different layers to that, right? Bills have to be paid, dishes have to be washed, etc. …

I finally figured out my magic formula, this funny 3-legged stool … I have to identify my priorities correctly so I can balance my resources right. And I have to get my balance right to maximize my power.

Being sturdy and flexible is about being powerful, able to create and to endure. Identifying priorities is about being powerful, in just the same way.

Identifying priorities. That is the task I’m working on now. I’ll talk more about that another time.

Scotland | Barge Trip Continuing To Banavie

The last part of our barge trip through the Great Glen of Scotland.

Our View From Iowa

by Jim and Melanie


On September 3 we began our week-long trip on the Fingal of Caledonia, one of two barges owned by Caledonian Discovery. Each day the barge averaged about 10 miles of progress. To read about our first few days, read here and here.

Loch Oich

On the fourth day we left Loch Ness at Fort Augustus, traveling through 4 or 5 miles of canal to Loch Oich, the smallest of the three lochs (lakes) in the glen. Some passengers including Jim biked to Cullochy Lock, which provides entry into Loch Oich. He was able to easily stay ahead of Fingal as evidenced in this video. On the way he encountered a startlingly large slug and a slow worm, which is not a worm or a snake, but a legless lizard.

A surprise treat was mooring up with the Fingal’s sister ship, the Ros…

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The Game’s Not Over!

Nope, we’re at the beginning of the fourth quarter, and there’s a lot of time to make a difference. What adjustments will you make to your strategy so you end the year with a win?

(Remember when we were in high school and learned about “stream of consciousness” writing? I don’t usually write that way — it can be hard to follow. But it’s been a long time since I wrote anything new here at all, so we’re gonna go with it…) 

After finishing four pieces at the beginning of August, and then heading out of the country for almost three weeks, I’ve been in a lull for both making and writing. It happens. And I don’t mind. The spell always breaks after a while, and I get revved up again.

One of my intentions this year was to make some quilts for the local VA hospital. My guild distributes some of our 200ish donation quilts a year there. They have a preferred size, approximately 48″ x 60″, and of course recipients are adults, so not all of our members’ contributions suit it. But I don’t much like making baby quilts or little kids’ quilts, as many people do. And with Son in the military, I’d rather make for the vets.

Last week I began by pulling all the dusky teals in my stash. To pair with them, I picked light fabrics with a golden or tan cast. Deciding on block size was … annoying. With 48″ x 60″, 6″ blocks work well (8 blocks by 10 blocks.) Note, though, that requires making 80 blocks. Also when making block quilts with an alternating block, I usually prefer odd numbers of blocks, such as a 7 block by 9 block layout. That allows the blocks to alternate in a balanced way.

Then there are the decisions about using a border or not, and if so, what fabric do I have enough of already in stash? Well, NOTHING. I have NOTHING in stash, to go with the teals, with enough yardage to make borders. Okay. No borders, just blocks.

Finally I decided on shoofly blocks to finish at 7.5″. With a 6 x 8 layout, the size would finish at 45″ x 60″, which works fine. That’s still even numbers, which affects the alternate blocks chosen. What works? Ones that have a diagonal line, such as half-square triangles. In fact, I considered other options but HST are simple and effective. I found a piece of toile just large enough (with some piecing) to make halves, and I pulled my old-fashioned rusty oranges for the other halves. (Some of those are pieced, too. I’ve gotten better at making the fabric work for me, as long as the area is enough. I CAN piece it together. I know how.) 

The picture below is blocks, before being assembled into a top. My overall standard for quilts is pretty simple: would I be pleased if someone gave it to me? The answer on this would be yes. The toile in the HST is paler than all the other lights used. One of the teals is pale, but doesn’t stand out as living in the wrong quilt. One of my teals has as much bronze as teal, and the bronze is what shows most in them. That’s okay with me, too, as it doesn’t stand out, either. And the HST with their strong contrast give great movement. (That’s why there isn’t a balance problem when using them as the alternate, when using even numbers in the rows and columns. The movement and strong line create their own balance.)


What I don’t have is backing fabric or batting. On my list for a stop later today.  (Wrote that yesterday. I stopped at JoAnn Fabrics last evening before meeting a friend for dinner. Got the batting. Picked up three yards of fabric for the back. Had 50% off coupons for both. If this were really stream-of-consciousness, I’d go on about that, and about my favorite quilt shop closing soon.)

hmm… what was I saying about the fourth quarter? What else do you want to get done before year’s end? And how do you fit it all in? I’ve seen a couple of blog posts recently on that. One is from my friend Tierney at She wrote about the seven habits of highly effective crafters, a crafty look at Steven Covey’s rules. It covers a lot more than getting projects done, but on that issue, the most relevant is putting first things first. In other words, decide on your priorities. What is most important is not always what seems most urgent. If there are things you want to finish by holidays, for instance, identify them now.

Lori at The Inbox Jaunt takes that a step farther. She recommends using a notebook to inventory projects. Once you know what you have, identify priorities and then list specific, small steps that need to be taken next, to move them along. (Do you quilt your own? Check Lori’s blog for seemingly unending resources for quilting designs and strategies.) 

At this point, I need to think about what I want to accomplish before year end. That will give me a way to identify priorities.

What’s left on your making list for the year? Will you get it all done?