Tag Archives: Mom

Mom

Mom’s birthday is today. In honor, I thought I’d re-run this post from two years ago.


This is a portrait of my mom, done in pastels when she was a young mother of five children. Today is Mom’s birthday. She died a few years ago. After my step-dad died, I ended up with the portrait. It hangs now in my quilt studio.

When I am working on projects, I have very little awareness of my surroundings. Unlike some people, who cherish special mementos around them, I don’t see anything except the work in front of me. But now and then I pause. When I look up and see Mom behind my long-arm, I’m surprised every time.

She could make anything. Sewing, tatting, needlepoint, crochet. Our community theatres enjoyed her talents as a costumer for many years. She created emperors and beggars, seven foot tall chickens and a cow, Tony and Maria and Officer Krupke. She remodeled bathrooms and kitchens and refinished furniture.

She didn’t leave a written legacy. No journals, no letters, never a greeting card. However, I do have a few other things from her I cherish.

I have three tangible items she made. One is a small wooden cabinet that hangs in our bathroom. Another is a cradle she made before our son was born. And another is a small standing cabinet, used in my childhood home as an end table in our living room. I won’t get to keep the cradle, ultimately, as it really belongs to our son.

As to intangible gifts, I think there are many. She was not a bigot, but welcomed people of all types into her heart. She gave me the gift of accepting others. She was frugal and ably met the challenges of a small budget with many expenses. She taught me how to be careful with money, too. She was imaginative, both in her ideas and in figuring out how to execute them. I immodestly will say, I think I learned by her example. She didn’t let other people’s ideas of what she should do rule her life, and she taught me that a woman can do whatever she chooses.

I didn’t inherit her Elizabeth Taylor-like beauty. I didn’t inherit her temper, more even than mine. But I still have the best of her in my heart. And every time I see her in my studio, I know my creative talents were nurtured by her example. Looking up, seeing her behind my long-arm, sharing my work with me, is a happy surprise every time.

Odds and Ends

So many things going on! There are several short blog posts I’d like to write. Instead, here’s a mish-mash of a few.

First, I’m excited to be presenting to the DeKalb County Quilters’ Guild tomorrow (Thursday) evening. I’ll be discussing design basics for medallion quilts and showing a few quilts in my portfolio. The meeting begins at 7:00 pm. The address for the presentation is
St. Mary’s Parish Activity Center (PAC)
322 Waterman Street
Sycamore, IL
Guests are welcome. I’d love to see you there!

Besides that, I’m working on a quilt with my sister Cathie. (Okay, make that two quilts. This weekend we’ll be quilting that hourglass together.) We’ve done “round” robins before, passing a top between us using a medallion format. Today I made some flower block parts for the next border of our current round robin. In fact, I’ll pass the flower parts on to her. Then she’ll get to decide whether to use them or not. Here are four of the blocks (not fully assembled) arrayed on my design wall in a bouquet.

I’m a member of the yahoo group called Stashbusters. Recently we’ve had discussions on chain-piecing with leaders and enders. Here is a post I wrote previously about that.

Another post I wrote before was on paying attention to your machine. I take good care of mine, cleaning out the lint regularly. Recently I had my main machine serviced to take care of the parts I can’t reach. It was a fairly small investment, less than $100. But today it was making noise as I sewed. I tried listening to it to determine what might be wrong. Ultimately I decided a new needle was in order. Listen to your machine. Often you can take care of the small problems yourself. (A related post you might enjoy is A Stitch in Time. It shares a little history and information on how your machine actually makes those stitches.)

Friday is my mom’s birthday. She would have been 83. I keep a picture of her on my wall and am always glad to have her with me.

And to the more trivial, I finally got my hair cut this week (!!!) and my new business cards came today.

I’m keeping busy. My life is full and I am very blessed.

Mom

This is a portrait of my mom, done in pastels when she was a young mother of five children. Today is Mom’s birthday. She died a few years ago. After my step-dad died, I ended up with the portrait. It hangs now in my quilt studio.

When I am working on projects, I have very little awareness of my surroundings. Unlike some people, who cherish special mementos around them, I don’t see anything except the work in front of me. But now and then I pause. When I look up and see Mom behind my long-arm, I’m surprised every time.

She could make anything. Sewing, tatting, needlepoint, crochet. Our community theatres enjoyed her talents as a costumer for many years. She created emperors and beggars, seven foot tall chickens and a cow, Tony and Maria and Officer Krupke. She remodeled bathrooms and kitchens and refinished furniture.

She didn’t leave a written legacy. No journals, no letters, never a greeting card. However, I do have a few other things from her I cherish.

I have three tangible items she made. One is a small wooden cabinet that hangs in our bathroom. Another is a cradle she made before our son was born. And another is a small standing cabinet, used in my childhood home as an end table in our living room. I won’t get to keep the cradle, ultimately, as it really belongs to our son.

As to intangible gifts, I think there are many. She was not a bigot, but welcomed people of all types into her heart. She gave me the gift of accepting others. She was frugal and ably met the challenges of a small budget with many expenses. She taught me how to be careful with money, too. She was imaginative, both in her ideas and in figuring out how to execute them. I immodestly will say, I think I learned by her example. She didn’t let other people’s ideas of what she should do rule her life, and she taught me that a woman can do whatever she chooses.

I didn’t inherit her Elizabeth Taylor-like beauty. I didn’t inherit her temper, more even than mine. But I still have the best of her in my heart. And every time I see her in my studio, I know my creative talents were nurtured by her example. Looking up, seeing her behind my long-arm, sharing my work with me, is a happy surprise every time.