Ohio Red and White Medallion, Fire and Ice

It’s been rather a slog, but I’ve finally finished the top of this quilt.

Fire and Ice. Unquilted top. Approx 68″ x 68″. Based on IQSC Object Number 1997.007.0797 from the International Quilt Study Center & Museum, a quilt from 1800-1820. March 2017

In general, construction was pretty simple. The delays came in decision-making, especially for the corner blocks. After originally considering making each corner different and including my initials and the year, I decided to make them the same. My first impulse there was to use Ohio Stars. I thought this would work well for style, and it would be a reference to the IQSCM’s belief that the original quilt may have been made in Ohio. I made a test block with an Ohio Star and wasn’t happy with it. I liked the way the star points repeated the hourglass construction of the first big border. However, somehow it just looked like too many small pieces.

After trying a few other designs in EQ7, I chose the modified variable star to center my blocks. It actually uses the same shapes as the Ohio Star but in different proportions. As I said to Jim, I can’t define why I like it better, but I do.

I’ve asked a talented, professional longarm quilter to quilt for me. This piece deserves better quilting than I can do myself.

In the meantime, I have plenty of other things to work on!

 

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33 thoughts on “Ohio Red and White Medallion, Fire and Ice

  1. shoreacres

    I don’t know the right names for the pieces, but what really knocks me out are those four three-piece additions to the corners of the center block. The strongly-implied circle that they add is just a perfect addition. It adds some liveliness to the quilt — a sense of movement — and really draws my eye to the center.

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    1. Melanie McNeil Post author

      I don’t know the right names for those pieces either. They are appliqued down, as are the same kind in the corner blocks. You are right about adding both a circular feel and the sense of movement. That’s especially important (in analysis after the fact!) because of the very heavy line just past them, that stops all movement for the moment. And then, outside of the heavy line, there are the small squares in the corners that help direct the eye outward again.

      Thanks much for taking a look and for your comments.

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  2. jmn111

    Beautifully executed! Shoreacres is right about the “circle” movement in the centre – very effective. I also like the symmetry of the heavy hourglass border – how the alternating positioning works out precisely. And your points on the outer edge are just perfect.

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    1. Melanie McNeil Post author

      Thanks for your comments. I’ve studied how alternating borders work, so chose this arrangement. I could have used 6 5″ blocks, or 5 6″ blocks, to cross the span. The larger blocks give a better arrangement, which is why I chose them. And as to the points, the paper piecing class was a great help! Thanks again.

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  3. katechiconi

    It’s wonderful! I do so agree that the corners you’ve decided on work best – I love the star, and the beauty in the centre best of all 🙂 Such a great piece of work. You must be very proud!

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  4. Nann

    Oh, I like it! I’ve toggled back and forth to see the differences between yours and the inspiration. I prefer your version. The corner blocks are inspired! Thanks for sharing the design journey with us, Melanie.

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  5. tierneycreates

    Funny, I was just thinking about this quilt yesterday and wondering how your progress was going. Maybe we have a psychic connection – ha! It is beautiful and well executed! Your work inspires me 🙂

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    1. Melanie McNeil Post author

      I think we ARE connected, Tierney! btw, I watched a documentary on Netflix this week on minimalism. It was interesting — didn’t tell me anything I hadn’t already thought about, but it’s good to ponder again. Jim watched the last half or so with me. Next day, a pile of jackets appeared, things he realized are in the closet, in the way, and not something he ever uses. 😉

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  6. Tamara Hutchinson

    I love this quilt and think your expert hand with math and piecing make it the beauty it is. Not to mention red + white! Yesterday I read about Penny Haren’s use of applique on pieced blocks, so the combo of applique with pieced blocks in this quilt is making me itchy to try something like this. Thank you -you’ve inspired me again.

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  7. Alice Samuel's Quilt co.

    This is so lovely! I’ve been going back and forth and I can’t even begin to analyze this. So much movement and I notice a new element every time I look. Your work is amazing! If I ever get into Medallion quilts it’ll be all thanks to you 😀

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  8. TextileRanger

    Like everyone else, I love those spread-wing diamonds in the corner squares and in the center. I love the way they echo each other. They are classic, yet not an ordinary, predictable choice. It’s phenomenal!

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  9. Paula Hedges

    This is so spectacular! I love red and white for a quilt, but it is the story behind this one that I love. I can’t wait to be so adapt at using EQ7 to design and have the freedom to change out what doesn’t look right. Thank you for sharing and kudos for doing an outstanding job!

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    1. Melanie McNeil Post author

      Thank you, Paula. I’d love to know MORE of the story, too! Who was the original quilter? What was her life like? What led her to choose this project, and was she pleased with how it turned out? 🙂 Thanks again.

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  10. KerryCan

    Wow! That is so striking! And you talk about it being a long slog yet it seems to me it went together pretty quickly. Of course, I am a serious slowpoke with such things. I’ll look forward to seeing the quilting–wish you knew someone who would hand quilt it for you, but that would be a life’s work.

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    1. Melanie McNeil Post author

      There are people around who will take hand-quilting, but the cost would be far too high to justify. Paying for custom machine quilting already is $$$. 🙂 As to going quickly or slowly, I guess the sense of speed is inversely proportional to how many other projects I have lined up! Thank you.

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  11. snarkyquilter

    I’m so glad you’re giving this top the extra custom quilting treatment. It deserves special care. I know you do pantograph quilting on many of your pieces, but this one cries out for the kind of quilting seen at national shows. And the appliqued bits are just the right grace notes.

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