A New Christmas Stocking

Our son lives far away and won’t be here for Christmas. However, he will still need a Christmas stocking. I’m not ready to send off the one he grew up with, so I made  a new one for him.

I chose fabric from my stash. The foot of the stocking is bright red, with whimsical instruments drawn in white. I used this fabric a few years ago as an accent in a quilt made for Son’s best friend. (They were in high school band together. Dan played trumpet (and soccer!) and Son played sax.) The cuff is from a Christmas print, one of the very few I have in stash. The backing is a plain white muslin. The batting was a scrap of some low-loft, low-density polyester, and it gives it just enough padding.

First I quilted the fabric with my long-arm. It’s probably just as easy to use your DSM, or even buy pre-quilted fabric if you find one you like.

Then I traced around my pattern, drawn using the stocking he got as a baby. The pattern has a seam allowance included. It isn’t very exact but for approximation’s sake, let’s say the seam allowance is 1/2″.
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I drew and cut out two. Remember you need two sides to the stocking, and the foot needs to face both ways.
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To keep the edges corralled, I stitched quickly around the edges of each part separately. Then I pinned them, right sides together. Using my walking foot, I stitched around, leaving the top open.
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Then next step was to create a cuff. I decided how deep I wanted it (4.5″), doubled that (9″), and added an inch (10″). The inch was the seam allowance for both edges that would attach to the top edge of the stocking. I cut the piece 10″ deep. I also needed to know how long to make it. Honesty: this was a bit of fudging. What worked fine was using the width of the finished stocking, doubling it, and adding something like 3/4″. Because the cuff needs to fit around the stocking, you need a little extra leeway. Then I sewed my cuff along the 10″ edges, right sides together, to make a tube. The seam allowance here is probably a fat 1/4″. As I said, I fudged a little.
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I turned the cuff and folded it to make a tube half as deep, with right side of fabric on the outside. I pressed the fold edge all the way around. Then I tucked a piece of batting into the folded tube to give the cuff a little poof. You could skip that if you prefer.

With the stocking turned inside out, I pinned the cuff to open edge of the INSIDE of the stocking.
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Again using my walking foot, I stitched the cuff down around the top edge, back-stitching at the beginning and end to secure. Once turned right-side out, the cuff lies nicely around the top. Finally, I used a piece of grosgrain ribbon to create a loop, attaching it with zigzag stitching.

Here is the finished stocking, featuring Son’s first Christmas present from Santa. Next to it on the right is his original stocking, which served as the model.
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29 thoughts on “A New Christmas Stocking

  1. katechiconi

    We have no family tradition of stockings, so I’ve never been tempted to make one, but it’s interesting to see how it’s done, and I now know where to go for a tutorial if I should ever need one! My mother was Dutch, and Sinterklaas came earlier, on 5th December with gifts left in shoes; Christmas was mostly a religious festival.

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    1. Melanie McNeil Post author

      My strong preference would be to separate the secular from the religious parts of the celebration. But in the US, mostly we don’t. I think it muddies it all up pretty substantially!

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      1. katechiconi

        I’ve been subject to other people’s version of Christmas since my early 20s, when my mother died and my father moved to Spain. The Husband and I have brought matters more under control by not giving gifts except to the very youngest members of the family. Instead, we make a very substantial donation to various charities in the name of Christmas. Everyone is used to it by now, and quite happy about it.

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    1. Melanie McNeil Post author

      The fabrics do all the work, don’t they? Would be so easy to make in ANY color or print, or patchwork, or … 🙂 When I was a kid my mom made appliqued stocking for us from felt. Most of the felt was glued down but all of the stockings were embellished with beads or stitching or bells.

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  2. jimfetig

    My dad used to knit stockings for us and the grandchildren. He even knitted our names into the cuff. Sadly, he’s gone now but a wonderful legacy lives on. Of note, knitted Christmas stockings stretch. That means maximum loot!

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      1. shoreacres

        We shared that. There always was a small apple, an orange, some nuts in the shell, a peppermint stick, and three or four very small other delights in mine — like fancy pencils, or a small watercolor set — that sort of thing.

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  3. shoreacres

    Your instructions are so good, even I could do this. I still have the stockings I needlepointed for Mom and me. I don’t hang them any more, but I always hang the kitty-cat’s stocking. It’s a felt Walgreen’s special, but big enough for all the important things Santa Claws leaves: a catnip mouse, a package of kitty treats, a feather. It doesn’t take much.

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