Parts

Worse things have happened. I cut 34 squares the wrong size. Rather than 1 3/4″, I cut them 1 7/8″.

Oops!

Generally it’s better to cut things too large than too small, right? After all, if they are too large, you can trim them to size. But since they are already small, and the trimming would be only 1/8″, I decided to cut whole new squares. Trimming seemed just too fiddly. The lucky part was I had plenty of fabric to do so.

I’m making parts for a small class sample. I’ll be teaching a beginners’ medallion class, which starts in October. The class project will teach five different blocks, including the flying geese used in the variable star. It’s a change-up from the standard sampler that many beginners’ classes teach. Of course for a beginners’ class, my design is purposely very simple, using only six fabrics.

This is the design I’m using with solid fabrics.

The sample is another experiment. Generally, medallion quilts don’t use a background fabric, the way the grey serves in this. But modern quilts use a lot of negative space, and modern medallions tend to have more of a background feel to them. Take a look at the Aviatrix medallion here. The pale grey is used from center to outer borders, and I think it is effectively done.

Here are the parts I have so far.

The grey is a little dark for my taste. That merits a big “oh well.” I think it will be very pretty when done and certainly will serve well as a sample.

Up for tomorrow: make the half-square triangles and assemble the top. And other projects await, as well! But I’m making progress.

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11 thoughts on “Parts

  1. shoreacres

    You made me laugh, remembering my dad. He’s intone, “Remember. Measure once, cut twice.”
    He was fond of, “Buy high, sell low,” too. It took me a while to understand why he always laughed when he said such things.

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    1. Melanie McNeil Post author

      Sweet memory. When I realized what I’d done, I thought, well, measure twice, cut once doesn’t work if you’re starting with the wrong number! 🙂

      And yeah, I had a lot of clients who wanted me to buy high and sell low… 😦

      🙂

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  2. bermudagirl

    It is nice to know these things happen to other more skilled quilters! Sometimes I will be listening to music and my 5 inch squares suddenly become 4 inches. I really love this design, it is so eye catching. I think the grey works fine, it makes the pinks and blues pop more, but I think you just need to see it when it is finished.
    Jodie

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    1. Melanie McNeil Post author

      Thanks, Jodie. I do love the star-in-a-star block for the center, and I think the grey works well for it. As I said, it’s just a little dark for my taste. I like high contrast, so it will depend on how the contrast with the other colors works.

      Thanks for taking a look.

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  3. denmck

    Been there, done that on the cutting. I have a pile of errors on my shelf that I know I’ll re-cut another day as needed. I really like how this design incorporates half square triangles, snowball blocks, flying geese, and squares with rectangles making a nine-patch type block. This will be great for beginners to get experience with a number of block-making techniques along with the medallion construction. Very nice!

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  4. Thread crazy

    Yes…I’m usually not as lucky as you and cut smaller that what’s needed. Not too often though but it does happen. Now you have a good example if what not to do for your class.!. I like the grey and think that once its assembled the other bright colors will make it pop! Its going to be pretty! A great example for your class.

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    1. Melanie McNeil Post author

      Yes, it does happen. Usually not a big deal.

      Thanks for the reassurance on the grey. As mentioned above, the low value contrast bothers me some, but the color contrast will probably make up for that.

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