Tip: Turn It Over

When pressing fabric, sometimes the iron drags on the print. Turn the fabric over, wrong side up, to allow the iron to glide easily.

If fabric is dark, it can be hard to see the edge of the ruler for rotary cutting. Turn the fabric to have the wrong side out. The wrong side is usually lighter and doesn’t have a distracting print showing. It is easier to make accurate cuts. (I’ve done this for a long time. And I read a tip similar to this in the Stashbusters Yahoo group a few weeks ago. I don’t remember who wrote it.)

Sometimes the paler, unprinted side is better for color or value in your quilt. Turn it over and take a look. You own both sides of the fabric, so you might as well see which side you really want to use.

Do you turn your fabric over? When is that helpful to you? Share with us!

Advertisements

10 thoughts on “Tip: Turn It Over

  1. Thread crazy

    I like to turn fabric over especially when pressing; most times I use starch and sometimes starch can leave a mark…depends on fabric, plus I find it easier to get wrinkles if I press on back side of fabric. I too have reversed fabric and used the back side when do a watercolor type quilt as it gave me the correct color value for quilt.

    Like

    Reply
  2. farmquilter

    I had one piece of fabric that was actually reversible – different print on the back side! It was great! I have used the back of fabric when it was the right color value. I use starch when my fabric is hanging out drying and then I will press from the back. I have never thought of cutting fabric from the back side – what a fabulous idea!

    Like

    Reply
    1. Melanie in IA Post author

      I was cutting one a couple of days ago that, depending on what you wanted from it was easy to consider reversible. Coincidentally, it also caused a lot of drag with the iron when I pressed it! That’s what made me pull these thoughts together.

      And yes, turning to the backside for cutting can help a lot. Get as much light on it as you can.

      Thanks for stopping by.

      Like

      Reply
  3. Neame

    I have also turned the cutting surface over. Sometimes the gridded surface makes it harder to see to cut. Flipping the curface over the ungridded side helped me see better for more accurate cuts.

    Like

    Reply

I love your comments!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s